The 7 Best Shoes for Morton’s Neuroma in 2019

Chances are if you suffer from Morton’s Neuroma, (which is an agonizing condition that causes pain within the ball of your foot), walking and performing daily tasks could be torture, so why add to that mess?

The pressure can be somewhat unbearable for those who suffer from the agonizing and persistent pain, so finding a pair of shoes could ultimately be the easiest way for providing daily pain relief and support for Morton’s Neuroma.

With the proper pair of shoes, you can easily become yourself again and get back to performing simple daily tasks pain-free.

The essential cause of this foot disorder is thickening, and perhaps the tightening of tissue that surrounds a nerve. This tissue typically connects to your toes, so the pain can seem to spread.

Again, proper support should be your first key factor in deciding on the best pair of shoes that will provide the best results for you. Whether you want to enjoy daily brisk walks or happen to be on your feet all day, there is a shoe out there for you!

Are you in a hurry? If so then feel free to check out our top recommendation- Orthofeet Most Comfortable Athletic Shoes.

Best Shoes for Morton’s Neuroma

Name

Made of

Sole

Price

Orthofeet Most Comfortable Athletic Shoes for Women

Mesh

Ortho-Cushion sole

Vionic Walker Shoes

Leather

Synthetic sole

Brooks Women's Ghost 11

Mesh

Rubber sole

KEEN Men's Austin Shoe

Nubuck leather

Rubber sole

Z-CoiL Pain Relief Men's Freedom Tennis Shoe

Leather

Rubber sole

Altra Men's Lone Peak 3 Running Shoe

Textile/ Synthetic

Rubber sole

Arcopedico Women's Shawna

Leather

Rubber sole

1. Orthofeet Most Comfortable Athletic Shoes for Women

Orthofeet Most Comfortable Plantar Fasciitis Verve Orthopedic Diabetic Athletic Shoes for Women

This shoe seems to tackle several issues. From Plantar Fasciitis and Diabetes, the orthopedic support within the insole helps to provide maximum comfort and support.

When it comes to Morton’s Neuroma, it is safe to assume that the support located within the base of the shoe and outside of it can help provide the daily aches you may experience.

Your heel will be slightly elevated, (not by too much), making the transition when you take steps much easier on your feet.

Pros

  • Built-in Orthopedic Support
  • Padded Insoles with Foam
  • Non-Binding, Flexible Upper
  • Arch Support
  • Outer sole contains air cushioning

Cons

  • Although the material may be flexible, these shoes will try to help boost and support your walk, which will take some getting used to.
  • Spring and an extra boost added to each step you take

The Orthofeet verve comes with a sleek design and support. The design and mesh material help bind to your foot to make walking a much easier process, but it may be a bit “controlled” before you get used to the shoes or break them in.

However, I surely still recommend these shoes due to the maximum comfort and support, especially within the base of the shoe.

2. Vionic Walker Shoes

Vionic Walker Shoes

Here we are with another orthopedic shoe that can provide much more support than what it may lead on to. Vionic walker shoes specially crafted for walking. I mean that seems obvious, right? All shoes typically are.

However, these shoes are perhaps the best for Morton’s Neuroma due to the implementation of “AMS,” which has been approved and worked on by numerous podiatrists.

Pros

  • Lightweight Upper material crafted from leather
  • APMA Verified Seal
  • Perfect Fit
  • Wider room for the upper part of the foot, along with the toes
  • Support for higher arches, and arches of all sizes

Cons

  • Synthetic Sole
  • Clunky Design

Vionic Walkers are without a doubt the best shoes for Morton’s Neuroma. Not because of the necessary orthopedic support, but the added joint and arch support that can elevate pain away from your feet.

Most orthopedic support-based shoes do, but with Vionic Walkers, the EVA footbed also happens to provide a smooth transition which each step, which prevents your walk from feeling too restrained or tight.

With these shoes, you will end up walking like yourself again, albeit without the pain!

3. Brooks Women’s Ghost 11

Brooks Women’s Ghost 11

Brooks Women’s Ghost 11 could look like any lightweight typical running shoe, but to those with Morton’s Neuroma, it could be a gift, the one sought out work out shoe those who suffer from the condition have been looking for forever.

The construction and overall buildup of the shoe are lightweight, as it is even manmade and put together hand by hand. The steps you take will become ultimately softer, as the movement from heel to toe will become much more lightweight and softer, in turn reducing pain.

Pros

  • Lightweight feel and material
  • Underfoot Comfort
  • High-Energy based cushioning
  • The inner-shoe lining is composed of soft fabric
  • Flexibility

Cons

  • Tight Fit
  • Mesh Upper (Not Ideal for those looking for long lasting shoes)

This shoe is truly a gift for those not only looking for comfort within the base of their shoes for their aching foot pain but those seeking flexibility.

The shoes lightweight and flexible can not only help aid in making exercise more comfortable, but simple everyday tasks can become much easier, and even a lot more enjoyable.

4. KEEN Men’s Austin Shoe

KEEN Men’s Austin Shoe

Looking for a full-leather shoe that is perfect for work and daily tasks? Look no further! The KEEN Men’s Austin shoe may seem simple and basic due to its classic design, but it is undoubtedly here to help those who suffer from Morton’s Neuroma.

It is perhaps an essential shoe for neuroma pain; the footbed is specifically designed to add extra cushion to help provide additional balance to your foot with each step.

Pros

  • Lace up-design, so essentially putting them on is a bit easier
  • Durability
  • Removal Footbed with comfortable cushioning that helps support the arch of your foot
  • Waterproof upper
  • Moisture-proof footbed

Cons

  • Generic, Basic Design
  • Not Budget Friendly

5. Z-CoiL Pain Relief Men's Freedom Tennis Shoe

Z-CoiL Pain Relief Men's Freedom Tennis Shoe

Perhaps the most “extraordinary” shoe on this list, this leather tennis shoe is crafted from high-quality leather and includes an extra feature; a coil.

It may seem self-explanatory based on the name, but the coil is located where the typical heel and base of a shoe should be, in which it lifts this part of the shoe up to provide comfort and support.

The coil reduces the daily direct impact that may cause foot problems, while also lowering pain in both the leg and back. Don’t worry too much about how high the coil may be, because Z-CoiL has you covered!

Extra cushioning has been implemented to the front part of the shoe to help boost a more natural walking motion and to provide more balance.

Pros

  • Wide Toe Area
  • Patented Coil
  • Extra Padding and Cushioning
  • Full-Grain Leather
  • Mesh Material

Cons

  • Fit may be a bit too small ( Half Sizes are not available)
  • Extra Padding in the tongue may cause the shoes to feel heavy or “stuffy.”

Although the look of this shoe is out there or not visually appealing, the shoe offers support for the several different pressure points around the base of your foot.

While it can treat problems and pain issues related to plantar fasciitis, it’s joint support, and pressure stemming from the unique design can surely help with the pain and difficulties arising from Morton’s Neuroma, making it one of the best shoes for a neuroma.

6. Altra Men’s Lone Peak 3 Running Shoe

Altra Men’s Lone Peak 3 Running Shoe

Aspiring to run and exercise can be downright despised and ignored if you suffer from Morton’s Neuroma, due to the ongoing pain with the condition.

Luckily, Altra has released a running shoe that will not only provide the typical comfort you expect to feel when running, but also comfort that lasts and supports the metatarsals all day. The upper is also durable, with it being a mix of both synthetic mesh and textile.

Pros

  • Advanced Guard Technology implemented within the shoe
  • Toe Box that is catered to fit around your foot and toe
  • Contoured Footbed
  • Available in two different color selections
  • Upper support for more than just the base of your foot

Cons

  • Rubber Sole
  • Runs small to size; fit can be a bit too tight even if accurate

More than a shoe for running and hiking activities than Morton’s Neuroma, this shoe still holds up, especially to those with athletic ambitions.

7. Arcopedico Women’s Shawna

Arcopedico Women’s Shawna

On the more feminine and design-friendly side of things, we have this shoe crafted for maximum foot support and comfort. This shoe crafted from leather, and it includes a small one-inch heel.

While the small heel can help add balance and more style, it ultimately discreetly helps to add even more support, and the mary-jane style helps them appeal with many outfits.

Luckily, Arcopedico is a company that already has a history of specializing in shoe support & comfort, so if you are a woman who suffers from Morton’s Neuroma, I would recommend this shoe.

Pros

  • Classic and Sleek Mary-Jane design
  • Elastic Instep included that helps provide comfort and security around your foot
  • Wide Selection of different colors
  • The footbed that provides helpful support to the metatarsals
  • Quality-leather upper

Cons

  • A heel; although it may provide support, this is not your best bet if you are looking for simple flats or sneakers
  • Exact fit may be hard to calculate; even with the wide range of shoe sizes, as the width varies.

Overall, this shoe has a cute design and a small heel. You probably couldn’t tell that it contains a specially designed footbed that helps offer maximum comfort and ongoing support.

I surely recommend this product to anyone looking for a casual-wear, yet semi-formal looking shoe that will hold-up over time while helping them with their foot condition.

This shoe is sure to elevate a healthy amount of weight from the muscles and damaged nerves connecting to the base of your foot and toes. This, in turn, can help provide a better sense of feeling back to your foot, as well as removing the painful burning sensation that unfortunately comes with Morton’s neuroma.

What to Look for When Buying Shoes for Morton’s Neuroma?

The pain stemming from Morton’s Neuroma can be agonizing, and make walking feel like more of a chore than an essential step in life. You have probably tried everything, maybe even elevation, or temporary relief with ice packs, and just about anything to get rid of the pain.

However, looking into buying a long-lasting support-based pair of casual shoes can not only reduce temporary pain but save you from a lifetime of walking-related pain and irritation.

Comfort

Comfort should essentially be the first step (no pun intended) to finding your perfect pair of shoes, as every casual sneaker should provide comfort. Be sure to read up on insoles and possible air cushions within the bottom of the shoe.

Arch Support

Arch support is also beneficial, although it may not be a direct key in helping you reduce joint pain and pain related to Morton’s neuroma. It is just an excellent extra addition to finding the right shoes.

Additional arch support can help relieve weight and therefore pressure on the base of your foot along with your toes, which can alleviate daily pain that may come from walking due to Morton’s neuroma.

Overall Support

Overall support (including arch) is what the shoe should focus on, so be sure to read up just precisely what areas of the foot the shoe provides key comfort and support to.

Too much of an arch can be a bad thing even if it relieves pressure because over time your pain can shift or become more prominent within the base of your foot.

So be sure to read up and do some further research on that portion of the shoe’s in-depth description. Avoid generic terms such as “support” or “arch support,” and go straight into reading the “fine print,” as in which part of the foot the shoe is best for.

If you’re lucky, then the shoe you have your eye on may have overall support and comfort that is equal. Chances are if you are investing in a pair of shoes to help with your condition, then purchasing a pair that will last is your best bet!

Materials

Now to some, this could depend on the brand, but to me, it depends on the materials. Now whatever materials you may choose is up to you, but be sure to read into how to keep them clean and from breaking down.

Mesh material isn’t bad per se, however, if you’re looking for something that will clash better with everyday wear and looks less “athletic,” than a shoe that contains a leather upper.

Leather is generally a high-quality material (if not synthetic), so it is guaranteed to keep a good fit and last a long time. Waterproof materials also should be highly sought after if you plan on wearing your shoes outdoor on several occasions.

Mesh generally is not waterproof, so this may not be the best shoe for you if you are an outdoor fan.

Shock Absoroption

Shock absorption may not be a term you are familiar with, yet it benefits when included in shoes is varied and offers excellent support, and holds up well within the long run. Its main benefit and priority are to provide lower amounts of kinetic energy within to your feet and body.

With every step, you take, therefore making it lighter and more comfortable for your feet. The impact, no matter how small it may be is less harsh on your feet, making for a lighter and easier walk each time.

Tips: Check out here to find the best shock absorbing shoes released in 2019.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. Why is there such a wide toe box included within orthopedic shoes?

A. It may seem like such a wide toe box/upper foot area is worthless, and that it might cause more friction. This is not the case, whatsoever. The extra depth allows just enough room for “hammer toes” to move around. Click here for best hammer toes shoes.

Most orthopedic shoes also contain a bit of elevation. Of course, this extra bit of hill removes a little bit of weight off your feet, helping to lessen the pain that comes with Morton’s neuroma. However, it also helps prevent foot deformities or even more bunions that may become present.

Even if you are suffering from Morton’s Neuroma, proper movement and flexibility are still essential and necessary for an appropriate healing process and easier way to walk.

Keeping your foot in the same position or squishing your toes together can send sharp shooting pains up and down the base of your foot; so keeping your toes just a bit spread apart is the best way to avoid this issue.

Q. Why are running shoes good for hammer toes or damaged feet?

A. Now, of course, you don’t have to run with a pair of running shoes.

Running shoes themselves are already manufactured to provide maximum comfort to everyday runners and athletes; this, in turn, can give longtime support and comfort to those with foot conditions such as plantar fasciitis, and of course, Morton’s Neuroma.

That extra support added for rocky mountain landscapes and trails is also beneficial to your foot’s arch, base, and toe area.

Q. How does reducing impact help your feet flourish?

A. The reduced impact cannot only help your feet, and overall walking improves, but it can also help your legs and even hips. In turn, your pain may improve over time as your muscles will not feel strained to carry on, especially without the extra pressure.

You can’t go through prolonged periods without walking, so wearing a shoe with healing benefits should surely be your prime idea. The muscles strained by Morton’s neuroma could heal and perhaps endure less damage over time.

Think of your condition as a sprained ankle. Now, of course, sprained ankles DO heal over time, it usually takes 2-6 weeks at most. The pain is unbearable, and you can barely stand to walk.

With Morton’s Neuroma, it is essentially the same, but lower down in the base of your foot and the weight time to either recover or at least walk usually again is exceptionally long.

Those who usually suffer from the condition are either on their feet all day, or women who wear heals who happened to endure a sprained foot injury due to the constant pressure on their muscle, causing it to tighten.

The last thing you would want is an arch that is too high or to put any more pressure on your foot. So any sneaker won’t do, and it could perhaps cause more of an injury. So that is why impact and impact pressure makes such a difference.

Conclusion

To wrap it up, proper support is key. It may seem obvious as with all shoes, but if you are suffering from Morton’s Neuroma, these terms can go a little more in-depth, and you will not need proper “support” or elevation.

Looking into a pair of shoes that will help relieve pain from the specific spots that are currently affected.

Your typical pair of shoes probably won’t get the job done, so luckily there are many new and varied options out there for the terrible condition, so be sure to pick the best one out there! Your feet and walking style will no doubt change but positively.

In a way, your way of life and joy will also change a bit, especially if you have been dealing with Morton’s Neuroma for a long time, and there has been an excessive strain placed on your already damaged muscles located within your feet.

While not a bone issue, your foot muscles work just about as hard, and they should be compensated for easily.

Insoles could help temporarily, but they obviously won’t last as long as a brand new pair of shoes specially crafted for your feet, and it's unfortunate muscle and tissue problems especially if you are a fit or active person who plans on keeping up and maintaining their lifestyle.

Robert Hallman
 

Robert Hallman is a sports enthusiast, writer, blogger & chief editor at Sportsly.NET. He haled from Big Lake, Texas. He is a regular sportsman and sports is his passion of life! He also loves to play all types of exotic sports, test different types of sports gears.

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